Growing Raspberries in Containers (2022)

Raspberries are very expensive to buy in the shops even when they are in season. A few raspberry canes grown in containers will give you a reasonable crop for very little outlay.

With good care the plants should last five or six years. Raspberries are very easy to care for and suffer from few problems.

KEY DATES FOR GROWING RASPBERRIES IN CONTAINERS

See the notes further down this page for each of the dates mentioned below because they will vary depending on the climate in your area. The dates in the table below are good for average areas in the UK.

Dates for summer fruiting raspberries marked S
Dates for autumn fruiting raspberries marked A
Dates for both are marked B

JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec
PLANTBB

B

PRUNESSA
FERTILISEBB
EATSSBAA

SUMMER VERSUS AUTUMN FRUITING RASPBERRY VARIETIES

When buying your raspberry canes you need to decide when you want to harvest the fruit. If you want raspberries from late June for a month or so then buy the summer fruiting raspberries. If you want the fruit later in the year, from mid-August to late September, then opt for autumn fruiting raspberries.

The two types above require pruning at different times of the year so it's best to plant one type only in a container.

RECOMMENDED VARIETIES OF RASPBERRIES FOR CONTAINERS

All varieties of raspberries are suitable for container growing but it's best to avoid tall growing varieties. These will be more adversely affected by strong winds when grown in the light soil of a container.

SUMMER FRUITING RASPBERRY VARIETIES FOR CONTAINERS
Glen Ample
A strong growing raspberry which produces larger than normal fruits. The raspberries are ready for eating from early July through to August. Good disease resistance. The canes are free from spines and they grow very upright reducing the need for support. Awarded an AGM and one of the most popular varieties.

Malling Jewel
Probably the best summer fruiting raspberry for containers because they have low growing and very sturdy canes. The fruit is a typical raspberry red colour and they are exceptionally tasty. Awarded an AGM, this is our choice for containers.

AUTUMN FRUITING RASPBERRY VARIETIES FOR CONTAINERS
Autumn Bliss
This is our choice of the autumn fruiting raspberries for containers. Raspberries are produced from mid August until early October. The canes are short and sturdy requiring almost no support in a container. Good disease resistance, especially as far as aphids are concerned. The fruits are slightly larger than normal.

WHEN TO PLANT RASPBERRIES IN CONTAINERS

The timing for planting raspberries in containers is the same as for planting in the open ground. The best time is from November to early March.

The reason for this is that the bare-rooted raspberry canes (by far the cheapest) are only sold in winter. Raspberries are sold ready planted in containers throughout the year. The picture above (click to enlarge) is of a bare-rooted raspberry cane.


HOW TO PLANT RASPBERRY CANES

First, fill your containers with potting compost. The ideal mixture is 80% general purpose potting compost plus 20% of loam based (John Innes for example) compost. The loam based compost will give the soil some body and help the roots to secure themselves firmly.

One or two raspberry canes can be planted in a container which is 45cm / 18in or more wide. Dig out a hole wide enough to take the roots spread out slightly. The depth is important, they should be planted to the same depth as they were grown. You will be able to see a soil mark near the base of the cane, plant them to that depth.

Firm the soil around the planted raspberry cane. Support can be a single bamboo cane or three pointing inwards and joined with string at the top. As the raspberry plants grow, tie them loosely to the canes to provide some support. Summer fruiting raspberries need more support compared to autumn fruiting ones. Water the container well.

(Video) How To Grow Raspberries In Containers

CARE OF RASPBERRIES IN CONTAINERS

Raspberry plants like moist soil at all times, but especially when the fruits are forming. The frequency of watering will depend on the size of the container. The larger the container the less frequent watering will be needed. In very warm weather it may well be necessary to water daily if the fruits are forming. If you can't be around to water for a few days then move the containers to a shady position protected from wind.

This will greatly reduce the water intake of the raspberry plant. They will survive deep shade for a week without any serious damage, but may well be killed if left for a week without water in full sun.

To help with water retention apply a mulch of stones, chipped bark or similar to a depth of 5cm / 2in, it dramatically reduces water evaporation.

The best water for raspberries in containers is rain water although tap water is OK as long as you aren't in a hard water area. If you are in a hard water area then invest in a water butt (see here for more information aboutwater butts) and use tap water sparingly.

Feeding raspberries is best done with both a long lasting fertiliser such as blood, fish and bone or bonemeal and top that up with a monthly liquid feed of a general-purpose feed.

Sprinkle a handful of long lasting fertiliser on the surface of the soil in March and June. Gently work the fertiliser into the top 2cm / 1in of the soil with a trowel and then water. The general purpose liquid fertiliser should be applied monthly at the concentration specified on the pack.

Raspberry plants are frequently strong growers and after a year or two growing in a container they will start to produce more than one stem. This can result in the container becoming overcrowded and you need to keep an eye on the situation. If the raspberries are autumn fruiting and multiple stems appear (keep the number of stems to two per 45cm / 18in pot) then select the strongest growing and cut the remainder back to ground level. check your plants once a month from April onwards for multiple stems and cut bck unwanted ones.

Preventing summer fruiting raspberries from over-crowding the container is a little more complicated. Bear in mind with summer fruiting raspberries that they produce fruit on canes which started growing last year. So in the summer when last year's cane is starting to produce fruit you will also need to have one or two more canes which are growing for fruit production next year.

Pruning aside (see below) that's all the care that your raspberry plants will need. The containers do of course need to kept weed free. Position your container in full sun or part shade. If your area is windy then position the container where the plants will be protected from the worst of the wind damage.

PRUNING RASPBERRIES IN CONTAINERS

Pruning raspberries is different for autumn and summer fruiting varieties because autumn fruiting varieties produce raspberries on canes which grow this year. Summer fruiting raspberries produce fruit on canes which started growing the previous year.

If you have autumn fruiting raspberry canes then pruning is simply cutting the canes back to 3cm / 1in above soil level in mid-February. It sounds harsh but this will encourage them to spring back to life in mid-March for another year's crop of delicious raspberries!

Summer fruiting raspberries should be pruned as soon as they stop producing fruit. Cut all canes which have produced fruit this year to ground level. Select one or two canes which haven't produced fruit this year and prune all the remaining ones to ground level.

It's relatively easy to distinguish between canes that have produced fruit this year from those that haven't. The new canes will have light green stems and they will generally look to be growing well. the canes that have produced fruit this year will be darker in colour and generally look a bit tired out!

HARVEST RASPBERRIES

Raspberries are best harvested when they are dry and the best time of day is either in the morning or evening when the temperatures are cool. This will help them last longer stored in the fridge.

To freeze raspberries lay them out one a shallow tray (in one layer only) and let them freeze. If you are lucky enough to have lots then bag up the frozen raspberries, place them back in the freezer and start freezing the next batch in the same way.

Bagged up, they will keep in the freezer for at least three months. When you defrost raspberries they will never have the texture of fresh raspberries but that's not a problem if you want to use them in cakes, sauces or drinks.

(Video) How to Grow Raspberries, Blueberries, and Blackberries in Containers

One tip for making frozen raspberries look good is to remove them from the freezer only a few minutes before you need them. They will stay in shape for a couple of hours and initially will have a delightful sugar-frosted look - see the picture of the Chocolate and raspberry cheesecake below.

Good recipes for raspberries (frozen and unfrozen) can be found at the following links:

Growing Raspberries in Containers (3)
Chocolate and Raspberry Cheesecake

Growing Raspberries in Containers (4)
Baked Raspberry Cheesecake

Growing Raspberries in Containers (5)
Eton Mess

PESTS AND DISEASES

Raspberries grown in containers suffer from the normal pests and diseases which affect those grown in the open ground. Rather than detail them here we provide a link here to a good page that deals with how to identify them and how to treat them.

READER COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS ABOUT THIS PAGE

11 March 2017

From: Mike

Excellent Info, I am just about to plant up my raspberrries in large 70ltr very deep containers using 70% General Purpose Peat basedCompost with added JInnes plus 20% addtiional JH No3 and 10% Perlite, and a P{H of 6 With 2" of Pine bark chips as Mulch. I will post how well it turns out.

18 February 2015

From: Sharon

Very helpful information

07 December 2014

From: Shyam Sharma

I am first time planter and needed this info. Thanks.

(Video) Planting Raspberries In Containers | Jack Shilley

08 June 2014

From: Sharon

I have avoided planting raspberries in my garden because they grow much TOO well in our climate and can become a nuisance. Someone suggested containers for raspberries... and it sounds like a really good idea. I have two questions though. First, can the pot take some freezing with the roots above ground in the container or would it be better to heel it in for the winter? Second is approximately how much fruit will one pot with two canes in it produce? I'm thinking not really very much and 3 or 4 pots would be a good amount for two people. We would probably like to eat them fresh while they are producing well and freeze them when there are too many to eat.

ANSWER: I live in the Midlands and they overwinter in containers just fine. I do move them close up against a hedge out of the wind during winter, against a house wall would do even better. In my experience they produce just as much fruit as canes planted in the ground. Four pots should keep you handsomely in raspberries! Three pots would be my guess but it depends how many you can eat. Remember, you will crop more in year two compared to the first year.

20 April 2014

From: Shyam Sharma

Very good info for a first time grower as myself.

10 August 2013

From: Barbara

Very very helpful. All the info I needed in one place!

5 June 2013

From: Sue

(Video) Growing raspberries in pots

Very helpful

21 April 2013

From: Grace

Helpful, all the info I need to get started!

17 April 2013

From: Not Given

Planted my first one! :)

16 April 2013

From: Not Given

Just what I was looking for.

07 February 2013

From: Pat

Great information!

ADD YOUR COMMENT OR QUESTION BELOW ABOUT THIS PAGE. IT WILL BE ADDED ABOVE WITHIN 12 HOURS

ONE PAGE RAISED BED CALENDAR PAGE

(Video) How to Grow Raspberries in Containers

FAQs

Can you grow raspberries in pots? ›

Raspberries, especially smaller varieties, can grow well in large pots in a sunny, sheltered spot: Choose a container at least 38cm (15in) wide and fill with 80 per cent multi-purpose compost and, to add weight for stability, 20 per cent loam-based potting compost.

Do raspberries do better in sun or shade? ›

Early spring is the best time to plant raspberries. Choose a planting site that is in full sun. The plants will grow in part shade, but will not produce as much fruit. Raspberries prefer rich, well-drained soil.

What to feed raspberries in pots? ›

Plant up to six raspberry canes around the perimeter of the container, gently firm them in, and water them. Make sure the compost doesn't dry out and feed your raspberries regularly with a high-potash fertiliser throughout the growing season to encourage lots of delicious fruit.

Do I need a trellis for raspberries? ›

Black and purple raspberries do not need a trellis, although you may wish to use a simple trellis like that described for the primocane-fruiting types. Figure 4. Summer-bearing red raspberry trained to a trellis, after pruning, in the hill system.

How long does it take for a raspberry plant to bear fruit? ›

For summer-bearing raspberries, it takes two years for each cane to produce fruit. Individual canes grow just leaves the first year, produce fruit the second year, and then die. You can cut second-year canes back to the ground after you've harvested all the fruit from them; each cane only produces fruit once.

How deep do raspberry roots go? ›

Raspberries spread through an extensive underground root system. If you're growing raspberries in raised beds, they need a planter at least 18 to 20 inches deep to accommodate their growth. Additionally, raspberries spread above ground by as much as 1 to 2 feet per season.

Do raspberry plants like coffee grounds? ›

In fact, there is one simple ingredient that you might already have in your kitchen that can be used as a natural fertilizer for raspberries–and that's coffee grounds! Coffee grounds are rich in nitrogen (a key element in the process known as photosynthesis) which encourages healthy plant growth.

Do raspberries need lots of water? ›

Water raspberries plants during the day. Give them about 1"-2" per week during growing season and up to 4" per week during harvest. The plants are rather shallow rooted, so moisture needs to be at the surface.

Can I cut raspberries down every year? ›

Growing raspberries is a great way to enjoy your own tasty fruits year after year. However, in order to get the most from your crops, it's important to practice annual pruning raspberry pruning.

Can you use tomato feed on raspberries? ›

Make sure soil is never too dry or too waterlogged. In spring, add a layer of manure around the base of the canes and you can water them with tomato feed as they fruit.

What happens if you don't prune raspberry bushes? ›

If you don't prune your raspberry bushes, they'll continue to grow and produce fruit, but the resulting overgrowth results in the canes competing for sunlight and nutrients, which may cause the lower portion of leaves and buds to die as they block out the sunlight from reaching the thriving canes.

What is the best compost for raspberries? ›

The ideal mixture is 80% general purpose potting compost plus 20% of loam based (John Innes for example) compost. The loam based compost will give the soil some body and help the roots to secure themselves firmly. One or two raspberry canes can be planted in a container which is 45cm / 18in or more wide.

Do I need two raspberry plants? ›

Raspberries are self-fertile, so you do not need to plant different varieties to cross pollinate. Because of their sprawling habit and need for sturdy support, the best place to grow raspberries is in a row at along the property line.

How do you care for a potted raspberry bush? ›

How To Grow Raspberries In Containers - YouTube

Can I grow raspberries against a fence? ›

While some types of raspberries can grow as free-standing clumps, the best way to cover a fence is to tie the canes directly to the fence. Use plant ties or soft string to tie the canes directly to the fence as they grow, supporting them both vertically and horizontally, depending on the cane size and fence height.

How many years do raspberry plants last? ›

Individual raspberry plants live for an average of 10 years with proper care, each year growing new canes that will produce fruit their second year. However, raspberries also send out underground runners that will develop into new plants, so a patch of established plants could survive for many years.

Should I remove raspberry runners? ›

Removing Raspberry Suckers

If your raspberry canes throw up suckers, you can remove these if required. Often, suckers can cause overly congested conditions around the base of your primocanes and floricanes, between rows. If these are close to the base of the canes, it is best to remove them.

Do raspberry plants come back every year? ›

Although the canes die off after their second year, the plant continues to produce new canes each year as well. When growing raspberries, you can choose from red, black, and even golden varieties. This allows for an ongoing harvest on second year canes, year after year.

How do you grow raspberries so they don't spread? ›

However, you can stop them from spreading this way by using a root barrier. A root barrier is any material that stops the roots of a raspberry plant from spreading beyond than the barrier. A wooden board is one option for a root barrier to stop raspberry plants from spreading.

Can you grow raspberries in a 5 gallon bucket? ›

Dwarf raspberry varieties will grow fine in a 5-gallon bucket with a 11-inch diameter, but larger standard raspberries grow best in a bucket with a diameter of at least 15 inches.

How much space do raspberries need? ›

Black and purple raspberries are most easily grown as individual plants because they do not produce primocanes from buds on the roots; space plants 3 to 4 feet apart. Rows of raspberries should be spaced 8 to 10 feet apart and plants 2 feet (everbearing) to 2.5 feet (summer- bearing) apart.

Where should you not plant raspberries? ›

Raspberry bushes should not be planted in an area where potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant or strawberries have grown in the last five years. They also should not be planted near these growing plants because of blights and other fungal diseases, like verticillium wilt, which can spread from these plants to raspberries.

Is Epsom salt good for raspberry plants? ›

Epsom Salt – 2 teaspoons of Epsom salt per gallon of water is highly effective during the blooming phase of the Raspberry. Epsom salt provides magnesium and sulfur to feed your plants and keeps the soil slightly acidic.

How do I make my soil more acidic for raspberries? ›

Soil pH in the 5.5 - 6.5 range is ideal for growing raspberries. When soil pH is outside this optimal range and low, lime can be mixed in to raise soil pH. Sulfur is used to lower soil pH. The recommended rate of material should be mixed into the upper 4 to 6 inches of soil.

Can raspberries get too much sun? ›

Raspberries can get too much sun. They can also get sunburned. Here's what too much sun looks like for raspberries. Intense sunlight caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, with or without accompanying heat, can cause real problems with brambles…

How often should I water potted raspberries? ›

The key is to keep the soil consistently moist but not wet. Watering 2-3 times a week is usually sufficient. In windy areas, hot, dry climates or during heat waves, you may need to water your potted raspberries a couple times a day. A soaker hose can provide slow, deep watering.

What do you do with raspberry plants in the winter? ›

Autumn-fruiting raspberries produce canes that flower and fruit in the same year. Simply cut all their canes to the ground in winter, to allow new canes to grow come spring.

How do you get rid of raspberry runners? ›

Raspberries spread by underground runners, so it helps to “wall” them off. Wherever new plants do pop up, pull them, getting as much of the roots as you can. You might also just mow or cut them down and pile heavy mulch on top. If you keep doing this, eventually the plants and roots will weaken.

Do you cut raspberries to the ground? ›

After raspberries have fruited the fruiting canes should be cut back to ground level. With summer-fruiting raspberries this will be in August time, but for fall-fruiting raspberries it will be later as they fruit from late summer up until November.

Is blood and bone good for raspberries? ›

Feeding Your Raspberries

Raspberries benefit from a feed when you plant them. Use fish-bone or blood fertiliser or a liquid general-purpose fertiliser.

What do you add to soil for raspberries? ›

Common soil amendments for raspberry plants:
  1. compost.
  2. sand.
  3. manure.
  4. garden lime (if native soil pH is too low/acid)
  5. baled sphagnum/granular peat moss (if native soil pH is too high/alkaline)

Is compost good for raspberries? ›

Raspberries appreciate a generous dose of good quality compost when they are first planted, and annual applications of compost after that.

What month do you cut raspberries back? ›

All raspberries should be pruned in March or early April. Late winter/early spring pruning procedures for the different types of raspberries are outlined below.

How do you winterize a potted raspberry plant? ›

To winterize a potted raspberry plant, bring the plant indoors to an unheated garage or sheltered area that will protect the plant from wind and cold. Cover the potting soil with sand or bark to insulate it. Provide some water to the plant, but not too much. And don't prune until end of winter.

When should I cut back my raspberries? ›

Once your raspberry plants have put on enough growth (which may not be until after their first year with you), aim to prune in the early spring, just as new growth emerges. Prune young canes back until they are around 4 to 5 feet tall.

Do raspberries like chicken manure? ›

Best organic fertilizer for raspberries

The best organic soil improvers to use for raspberries are compost, aged cow manure and pelleted chicken manure. All can be dug into the soil before planting your raspberry canes or plants.

What can you not plant near raspberries? ›

Raspberries should not be planted alongside nightshades like eggplant, potato, or tomatoes, as they are particularly susceptible to blight and verticillium wilt. Avoid planting raspberries near similar crops like boysenberries, blackberries, or gooseberries to prevent the transfer of soil-borne fungal diseases.

Can blueberries grow next to raspberries? ›

Here's why blueberries and raspberries are bad roommates. Blueberries need very acidic soil to thrive, doing best in beds with a pH of 4.8 to 5.5. Raspberries need soil that's only mildly acidic, around 6.0. If you plant them side-by-side, only one of them will thrive in the soil.

Why do you have to plant blackberries away from raspberries? ›

However, some gardeners recommend against co-planting blackberries and raspberries because some varieties can be more susceptible to certain diseases or pests than others. For example, black raspberries are prone to anthracnose, a type of fungal disease. Red raspberries are less susceptible to anthracnose fungus.

Can raspberries survive winter in pots? ›

Caring for blueberries, raspberries and blackberries in containers over winter is easy. Prevent roots from freezing and cold winds from drying out the plant's branches with just a little care. Many berry shrubs don't need much water while dormant, but check containers at least once a month.

Can you grow raspberries in a hanging basket? ›

Strawberry plants will produce runners after they have fruited, so you can snip them off and pot them on to create new plants completely free of charge! Other berries that love a basket include gooseberries and raspberries as well.

Why are my raspberries not producing fruit? ›

Improper pruning is a common reason for having no fruit on raspberry plants, but other issues can also be the problem. Plants which fail to reach full size or produce fruit can be caused by improper growing conditions, pests or disease. Raspberries grow best in raised beds full of rich, fertile soil.

How tall should a raspberry trellis be? ›

The posts should be 5-6 feet long so that 1-2 feet are below ground and 4-5 feet are above ground. Twist the earth anchors in, one on each end of the row, 2-3 feet behind the end posts. They should be all the way into the ground so that just the top loop is exposed.

How many raspberry canes do I need? ›

Select the strongest young canes that have grown during the current season, around six to eight per plant, and tie them in, 8–10cm (3–4in) apart, along the horizontal wire supports. These will fruit the following summer.

Do raspberries like manure? ›

sun, however they are originally woodland plants, so will grow happily in dappled shade. They thrive on most well-drained soils, especially neutral to acid ones. On shallow, dry or chalky soils it is very important to add plenty of well-rotted manure or good garden compost to the ground before planting.

Can raspberries survive winter in pots? ›

Caring for blueberries, raspberries and blackberries in containers over winter is easy. Prevent roots from freezing and cold winds from drying out the plant's branches with just a little care. Many berry shrubs don't need much water while dormant, but check containers at least once a month.

Can you grow raspberries in a 5 gallon bucket? ›

Dwarf raspberry varieties will grow fine in a 5-gallon bucket with a 11-inch diameter, but larger standard raspberries grow best in a bucket with a diameter of at least 15 inches.

Can I use a tomato cage for raspberries? ›

A simple trellis, fence, or even tomato cage works to keep raspberry plants (and the fruit) up off the ground. Space individual plants according to their mature width to avoid crowding and competing for nutrients.

How many raspberries do you get from one plant? ›

Average yield per plant is 1 to 2 quarts of raspberries.

What do I do with raspberry plants in winter? ›

Autumn-fruiting raspberries produce canes that flower and fruit in the same year. Simply cut all their canes to the ground in winter, to allow new canes to grow come spring.

How often do you water raspberries in pots? ›

The key is to keep the soil consistently moist but not wet. Watering 2-3 times a week is usually sufficient. In windy areas, hot, dry climates or during heat waves, you may need to water your potted raspberries a couple times a day. A soaker hose can provide slow, deep watering.

How long do raspberry plants live? ›

Individual raspberry plants live for an average of 10 years with proper care, each year growing new canes that will produce fruit their second year. However, raspberries also send out underground runners that will develop into new plants, so a patch of established plants could survive for many years.

Do raspberries need full sun? ›

Raspberry bushes grow best in full sun (at least 6-8 hours), in rich, well-drained soil. Gardeners from zone 3 all the way to zone 10 can grow raspberries successfully, given the right variety. Read plant descriptions carefully when purchasing and select plants that will thrive in your growing zone.

What soil is best for raspberries? ›

Raspberries prefer full sunlight and grow best in well-drained, sandy loam soils rich in organic matter. Avoid low areas that remain wet late into the spring, but select a site with access to a water supply. Irrigation is important for good plant growth during dry periods and can improve fruit size and yield.

Can raspberries grow in shade? ›

Raspberries grow best in a sunny location, but unlike many fruits, will also grow successfully in a partially-shaded spot. However: the more sun, the more fruit! The planting site should have rich and well-drained soil, great air circulation, and shelter from wind.

How deep should a container be for raspberries? ›

Planting tips: Plant raspberries in a container that is at least 24 to 36 inches wide and deep.

Where should you not plant raspberries? ›

Raspberries should not be planted alongside nightshades like eggplant, potato, or tomatoes, as they are particularly susceptible to blight and verticillium wilt. Avoid planting raspberries near similar crops like boysenberries, blackberries, or gooseberries to prevent the transfer of soil-borne fungal diseases.

How tall should a raspberry trellis be? ›

The posts should be 5-6 feet long so that 1-2 feet are below ground and 4-5 feet are above ground. Twist the earth anchors in, one on each end of the row, 2-3 feet behind the end posts. They should be all the way into the ground so that just the top loop is exposed.

Can I cut raspberries down every year? ›

Growing raspberries is a great way to enjoy your own tasty fruits year after year. However, in order to get the most from your crops, it's important to practice annual pruning raspberry pruning.

What happens if you don't prune raspberry bushes? ›

If you don't prune your raspberry bushes, they'll continue to grow and produce fruit, but the resulting overgrowth results in the canes competing for sunlight and nutrients, which may cause the lower portion of leaves and buds to die as they block out the sunlight from reaching the thriving canes.

What fertilizer is best for raspberries? ›

Raspberry plant fertilizer should be heavy in nitrogen, although a balanced type is often preferred. For instance, the best fertilizer for raspberry bushes is a 10-10-10 fertilizer or actual nitrogen at a rate of 4 to 5 pounds (1.8 to 2.3 kg.) per 100 feet (30.4 m.)

Videos

1. Planting a berry bush in a container Straight to the Point
(The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener)
2. How To Grow Raspberries At Home In A Container Even
(Jules Gardening Tips)
3. Pruning Raspberries - Why? How? When? (2020)
(The Ripe Tomato Farms)
4. How to Grow Raspberries at home in Pots - Gardening Tips
(Go Green)
5. From Garden to Container | Transplanting Raspberries
(the Urban Gardener)
6. How to Plant RASPBERRIES in a CONTAINER
(Where the YoCals Grow )

Top Articles

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Wyatt Volkman LLD

Last Updated: 01/22/2023

Views: 6251

Rating: 4.6 / 5 (66 voted)

Reviews: 81% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Wyatt Volkman LLD

Birthday: 1992-02-16

Address: Suite 851 78549 Lubowitz Well, Wardside, TX 98080-8615

Phone: +67618977178100

Job: Manufacturing Director

Hobby: Running, Mountaineering, Inline skating, Writing, Baton twirling, Computer programming, Stone skipping

Introduction: My name is Wyatt Volkman LLD, I am a handsome, rich, comfortable, lively, zealous, graceful, gifted person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.